El Niño 2015/16: A recap

El Niño contributed to a mild winter in the Miami Valley

By Mike Ekberg, water resources monitoring and analysis manager

If you thought the region got off easy this winter, you’d be right.  And you can thank El Niño.

El Niños  produce drier and warmer than normal winters
El Niño affects weather worldwide by changing the way air circulates in the atmosphere.

El Niño is a weakening of eastward blowing winds over the Pacific Ocean creating warmer than normal water in the eastern Pacific Ocean near the equator.El Nino graphic

El Niño tends to keep the polar jet stream—and cold arctic air—farther north and out of the Miami Valley. It also tends to shift the Pacific jet stream—and winter storm systems—to our south. Together these patterns tend to produce warmer and drier winters locally.

Above average temps and precip
Average monthly temperatures for January through March were well above normal, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Dayton saw above-normal daily average temperatures all three months. This is exactly what we expect during an El Niño winter. The 2016 winter was the 10th warmest recorded for this region, dating back to 1895.

Precipitation was near normal, with an average of 8.94 inches in the Miami Valley. That’s 0.87 inches above normal. January and February precipitation were below normal, but March was above normal. So winter 2016 brought more precipitation than expected for an El Niño winter.

It’s anyone’s guess as to why precipitation was greater than expected. Other factors besides El Niño influence local weather. Sometimes the random nature of weather is beyond our ability to predict.


La Niña on the way?
While El Niño 2015/16 was one of the strongest ever recorded, it’s weakening. Most climate forecasts predict it will end during late spring or early summer and will eventually change over to a La Niña phase. Some forecasters expect that shift this summer.

It’s too early to tell how La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean will shape our next winter. Stay tuned.

 

Advertisements

Well Owners – Is your drinking water safe?

Contamination is more common than you think

By Mike Ekberg, MCD manager for water resources monitoring and analysis

Hey well owners, when’s the last time you had your drinking water tested? If you’re like many well owners in the United States, you probably have never tested your water. Why should you bother? You have plenty of water and it tastes good, right?

If you want to be sure your drinking water is safe, you need to get it tested.

Test at least annually
The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) recommends well owners test their water at least annually for bacteria, nitrates, and contaminants specific to your area. Consider more frequent testing if:

  • There is a change in taste, odor, or appearance of well water.
  • The well has a history of contamination.
  • The well is near a failing septic system.
  • There have been recurring incidents of gastrointestinal illness.
  • An infant is living in the home.
  • Home water treatment equipment has been installed.

In our area, I recommend the following tests:

E. coliE. coli bacteria is a specific indication of fecal contamination in the well. Its presence is a warning that disease-causing bacteria may have entered the well.

Nitrate – Nitrate gets into drinking water from fertilizers, manure, and septic systems. It also occurs naturally. High nitrate levels present a health concern for infants if the water is mixed with formula. High nitrate levels can also suggest other toxins such as bacteria and pesticides.

Arsenic – Arsenic is naturally occurring in groundwater. It’s linked to various cancers and other health issues.

Manganese – Manganese also occurs in nature and can be present in groundwater. At high enough levels, it may cause brain damage.

Lead – Lead typically gets into drinking water from corroded pipes and plumbing fixtures. If your home was built prior to 1986, it’s more likely to have lead pipes, fixtures, and solder.

 

Get help with testing
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has a website with contact information about state-certified labs that can help with testing. Contact a lab and have the staff help you collect water samples and explain the results.

Ohio State University (OSU) also offers an on-line tool to help you understand the results. The OSU site offers a lot of information for well owners.

Bigger problem than you think
Recent studies show that private well contamination is not rare. A 2009 United States Geological Survey study of more than 2,000 private wells found about 23 percent of the wells had problems. More recently, MCD surveyed 107 private wells. Twenty percent of those wells had unsafe levels of arsenic in the water.

The need for testing is real. Now go out and get your water tested!